Tag Archives: Manuscript

The Last Page of the Medieval Book

By Erik Kwakkel (@erik_kwakkel) I love the last page of the medieval book. Not because it means that my research of a particular manuscript is almost completed, but because the last page often provides information pertaining to the origins of the object – information not … Continue reading

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Games of Thrones? Popular Medieval Board Games

By Jenneka Janzen Living without modern entertainment luxuries, what did medieval people do for fun? Surely it wasn’t all farm labour, praying, or jousting (to play into common misconceptions)? Believe it or not, several of our favourite board games originated … Continue reading

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Mark Their Words: Medieval Bookmarks

By Jenneka Janzen When talking about manuscripts with the uninitiated, I usually mention how features that guide us through our modern books – running titles, subheadings, and indices, for example – originated in the Middle Ages. Yet, I tend to … Continue reading

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Listening to the Text: The Medieval Speech Bubble

By Julie Somers My colleagues and I at the Turning Over a New Leaf Project spend a lot of time thinking, talking, and reading about, well, reading. More specifically, we question the various forms of reading, as well as the … Continue reading

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Judging a Book by its Cover: Manuscript Bindings Without Bling

By Jenneka Janzen Our blog has featured medieval bindings before (Jenny’s blog on “bling” bindings was recently published in Quest magazine) but with an eye to the extraordinary, and extremely rare. In fact, finding an intact medieval binding, never mind … Continue reading

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Unfurling the Past: Ancient & Medieval Scrolls

By Jenny Weston Here at the Turning Over a New Leaf project, we tend to focus our attention on the medieval ‘codex’ — texts hand-written on parchment, folded and sewn into quires, then wrapped together in a binding. The codex, however, was not … Continue reading

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The Beauty of the Injured Book

By Erik Kwakkel (@erik_kwakkel) While our eyes are naturally drawn to pages filled with color and gold, those without decoration can be equally appealing. Indeed, even damaged goods – mutilated bindings, torn pages, parchment with cuts and holes – can be highly attractive, as … Continue reading

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“There’s a map for that!” Visualizing the Medieval World

By Jenneka Janzen Generally, a map is a visual illustration of an area, a means to symbolically represent spatial relationships between objects, regions, and even ideas. I bet for many of us we most commonly use maps to find the quickest bike … Continue reading

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CSI: Manuscript Edition

By Ramona Venema Ramona Venema works as a research assistant in the Turning Over a New Leaf project. She maintains her own cookery blog. When I was a small Ramona, I wanted to be an archeologist. I love how history becomes … Continue reading

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Historiated Initials: Letters with a Story to Tell!

By Jenny Weston Medieval initials come in all shapes and sizes. They also come with different kinds of decoration. While some feature twisty vines, flowers, and other abstract designs, others present more detailed and distinctive figures and scenes. Known as … Continue reading

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