Author Archives: medievalfragments

Listening to the Text: The Medieval Speech Bubble

By Julie Somers My colleagues and I at the Turning Over a New Leaf Project spend a lot of time thinking, talking, and reading about, well, reading. More specifically, we question the various forms of reading, as well as the … Continue reading

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Judging a Book by its Cover: Manuscript Bindings Without Bling

By Jenneka Janzen Our blog has featured medieval bindings before (Jenny’s blog on “bling” bindings was recently published in Quest magazine) but with an eye to the extraordinary, and extremely rare. In fact, finding an intact medieval binding, never mind … Continue reading

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The ‘Punctus’ and his Friends: Medieval Punctuation

By Ramona Venema Ramona Venema works as a research assistant in the Turning Over a New Leaf project. She maintains her own cookery blog. Today, a world without punctuation seems impossible. How could we survive without the Oxford comma? We rely on … Continue reading

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Unfurling the Past: Ancient & Medieval Scrolls

By Jenny Weston Here at the Turning Over a New Leaf project, we tend to focus our attention on the medieval ‘codex’ — texts hand-written on parchment, folded and sewn into quires, then wrapped together in a binding. The codex, however, was not … Continue reading

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Reeling Back the Years: Commemorating the Middle Ages

By Irene O’Daly As preparations for the World Cup gather momentum here in the Netherlands, it is worth remembering some of the other reasons why 2014 is an important year. Many commemorations across the world are marking the passing of … Continue reading

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The Beauty of the Injured Book

By Erik Kwakkel (@erik_kwakkel) While our eyes are naturally drawn to pages filled with color and gold, those without decoration can be equally appealing. Indeed, even damaged goods – mutilated bindings, torn pages, parchment with cuts and holes – can be highly attractive, as … Continue reading

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A Window on the Middle Ages and Some Famous Clothes

We are delighted to present a guest post today by Prof. Francis Newton, Emeritus Professor of Classics at Duke University.  I was once lucky enough to spend a year in a tiny, mostly mediaeval village in France. A cultivateur whom … Continue reading

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From Sound to Image, From Language to Culture; A Review of Medieval Academy of America Conference 2014

By Julie Somers Last week the annual meeting of the Medieval Academy of America was held at UCLA in California. Every year this conference brings together scholars from all over the world to discuss and share experiences related to their … Continue reading

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“There’s a map for that!” Visualizing the Medieval World

By Jenneka Janzen Generally, a map is a visual illustration of an area, a means to symbolically represent spatial relationships between objects, regions, and even ideas. I bet for many of us we most commonly use maps to find the quickest bike … Continue reading

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CSI: Manuscript Edition

By Ramona Venema Ramona Venema works as a research assistant in the Turning Over a New Leaf project. She maintains her own cookery blog. When I was a small Ramona, I wanted to be an archeologist. I love how history becomes … Continue reading

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